Why I Still Love Dystopians + A Dystopian Review (!!)

Confession time. I still love dystopian books.

I made that sound so dramatic, but for some reason I feel like dystopian books are so underrated these days. These days meaning in 2018. I mean, I can’t think of a dystopian book that I’ve heard people talking about that was published recently. And that makes me sad, because the thing is, I love dystopian.

giammarco-boscaro-380903-unsplash (1).jpg

Today I’m going to be sharing reasons I’m still obsessed with dystopian novels (even though the glory days of The Hunger Games are mostly over *tear*) and also be doing a very exciting review of a dystopian short story I was given the opportunity to read recently. I’m excited, so let’s jump right in!

arrow

1. They each have a unique twist

As we all know, many dystopian novels have the same old cookie cutter mold.

You know the drill: tyrannical government, the main character wants to rebel from the government, goes on adventure to do so, risks life in the process, blah, blah, blah.

Image result for bored gif

Okay, so maybe dystopian novels can be a tad predictable. But you know what I love? Each and every one has a small twist that makes it different from all the others.

Even though you’re reading from the same basic mold, each book isn’t the same. It’s like the cookie cutter analogy- yes, okay, maybe they’re all regular old sugar cookies, but some have red sprinkles and some have frosting and some have chocolate chips. They’re the same…but different.

Now I’m just hungry. But that kind of made sense, right?

arrow

2. There’s tons of action

Can we all agree that the adventures in dystopians are the best?

Escapes from tyrannical governments are always interesting if you ask me. Usually it involves the main character along with one or more accomplices, and sometimes they take super long treks through rough terrain and sometimes they just run away through the woods and sometimes they fight to the death in an arena.

Come to dystopian books, where action (and likely death) is always abundant!

arrow

3. The settings are interesting

I get so drawn in by dystopian settings. I especially love it when authors take a place we know and love right now and show what they think it would be like in the future.

For example, in the Selection series, North America has been renamed Illéa and split up into tons of new sections that all answer to the throne (in modern-day California). I absolutely love seeing how authors dream up the setting of their stories.

Image result for so cool gif
literally me when reading dystopian settings

Even if the setting isn’t somewhere specific, I still love learning about all the rules and customs of the ‘society.’ It’s just so different from my life (thankfully), and that’s what makes it so interesting!

arrow

4. They keep me intrigued the whole time

I’m always at the edge of my seat when it comes to dystopians.

Since the world is so new and unexpected, I honestly have no idea what’s going to happen next. I don’t know what the society will do, I don’t know how the character will react, and it’s just such a thrill to read about.

All the adventures, and escape plans, and rebellion (oh my!). I can’t help but keep on reading so I can learn what happens next!

arrow

Speaking of dystopians, and books that kept me on the edge of my seat, I have a very special review to do today.

A fellow blogger, Audrey, (visit her blog here and learn more about her here), recently asked me to read and review her dystopian short story, and of course I was beyond excited to do so.

A little about her book:

  • It’s a 40 page dystopian short story
  • It’s written in episode form, and the part I read (and what she’s released so far) was the first season (which is literally so cool and creative wow)
  • It’s called Dean & Lily
  • Not only does it come with just the story, but also with aesthetic boards! And extra information about the characters! And so much fun stuff!
  • Here’s the official synopsis:

    Five years ago, the Arts were considered a hindrance to the cause and banned. But Dean and Lily disagree with the leaders of their country.

    When joining the Troupe (an illegal organization that works on saving the past and future of the artistic world) the former drama-magnet couple is going to have to face their love troubles in order to fight for what they believe in.

And if you’re interested in reading it, then you most definitely can! Just head over to her website, and she has a few easy ways to get your hands on it. You can get a copy for free by subscribing to her email list, or you can purchase your copy for just $1. 🙂

Now that all the official stuff is out of the way, let’s get into the review!

arrow

First of all, I love the premise of this book.

Image result for excited gif
me being extremely excited

The arts are so important to me- dance, music, books (reading is an art right?? idk) and I can’t imagine what life would be like without it. So it’s literally the PERFECT idea to have a dystopian book where art is taken away and then the character is part of a rebellion to get back the art.

I love love love love love it.

Second, I’m obsessed with the unique organization of this book.

Not only is it separated into short episodes instead of chapters, but at the beginning of the book, the two main characters (Dean and Lily) each get a page that says their likes and dislikes. So going into the story, you know a little bit about them, and what makes them alike and different from each other.

Some other things I really, really enjoyed:

  • All the ominous vibes surrounding Lily’s initiation into the rebellion group
  • The tension between her and Dean
  • THE WRITING was just so amazing and descriptive and I’m in love with Audrey’s writing style!
  • The fact that other characters were able to be introduced even though the story has only had a few episodes so far

This is a pretty short review, since Dean & Lily only has one season so far. Still, in the episodes I’ve read so far, I’m intrigued and can’t wait to see what happens in the seasons to come! Of course I had to award it…

Image result for 5 stars

I really hope you’re all able to get your hands on this story at some point! It’s entertaining and will keep you on the edge of your seat. 😉

arrow

And that concludes my discussion and review! A big thank you again to Audrey for allowing me to read her wonderful book. I can’t stop screaming with excitement about it!

Do you like dystopians? Why or why not? Do you think you want to read Dean & Lily? I’d love to chat with you in the comments.

Screen Shot 2018-03-13 at 2.11.19 PM

Advertisements

54 thoughts on “Why I Still Love Dystopians + A Dystopian Review (!!)

  1. This is such a great post, Olivia! 💓

    I’d just been thinking about it today, and how I sad I am that dystopians have “gone out of style”, because one of my favorite series is actually a dystopian one.

    I really loved reading this, and your review was lovely! ❤️

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Yasss, I love dystopian too! *high fives*
    Currently reading The Blood Race… sci-fi, dunno if it’s dystopian but Google says that their will be some elements of it fir their in the series.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Okay, I’ve read some of the major dystopian series (Divergent, Hunger Games, the Selection, Matched), but I don’t really like the genre as a whole. I just never gravitate toward them. Hm, I think I don’t like them for a couple of reasons. As you mentioned, they’re similar in plot, and from what I’ve read, their writing style is not the kind that I really like. But, since you specifically said Audrey’s writing style is something you loved, I will definitely be checking Dean and Lily out!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Ohhh this is such a great post ❤ I have to admit that I haven't read as many dystopian books as I did before and I feel like the genre is a bit, forgotten, but you're so right that dystopia still is a great genre and I love reading it, from time to time – probably a bit less often than before, though. I just love the world-building as well, it's kind of fascinating and I love how it always keeps me on my toes. If the concepts seem pretty much all the same, there's always a little twist, something that manages to make a book unique at times and I love that. This reminds me of This Mortal Coil, that book was an excellent read 😀
    Wonderful post!! ❤ ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Great post!!!!! I know this sounds funny, but I’ve never read a dystopian novel. *cringes* I really want to now, especially after this post!!!! Dean&Lilly seems really interesting!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. To be honest, I’ve grown a bit out of dystopians–I’m more of a high fantasy lover now. ♥ Of course, I do get your points! Dystopians always have these little things that go, “Whoa! I wish I’d thought of that!” and I admire dystopian authors so much. I still do read them, and love the action in them, but it’s not a favorite genre for me any more. So happy that you still love it, though!!! ♥

    – Aimee @ Aimee, Always

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s definitely understandable! Oh, I wish I was more into fantasy…it’s a goal of mine. 😉 So true! I feel like even if I don’t read dystopians, I will always have a place in my heart for them and admire the authors, like you said. XD Thank you for reading!

      Like

  7. I like dystopian too! Dystopian YA novels are what got me reading YA (ie. Hunger Games and Divergent)so it’s a special genre for me. It seems like now there are less and less well known dystopians. I agree with you, although dystopian books are similar, they are still interesting because there is usually a twist that makes the book unique! The world created in these books are usually very well developed too. Great post 🙂 ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I haven’t read many dystopian novels in the past two years, mostly because my tastes have shifted over to fantasy. There are a few dystopian which will always stand the test of time– the Hunger Games, Divergent, 1984, and Brave New World (the last two are classics and somewhat graphic but wow are they really terrifying and spot on they are). Also, the action scenes are just SO GOOD. xD

    xoxo Abigail Lennah

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, that makes sense! I agree, the ones you mentioned (I haven’t heard of Brave New World, though) I think will always be well known. 🙂 I wasn’t a fan of 1984, but I still admire it, as it is a classic. XD

      Thank you for commenting & reading, Abigail!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yeah, I agree 1984 can be dry at times. Brave New World is more… graphic than 1984, particularly because it portrays a rather sodomy filled world, but like 1984 both portray where we could potentially be heading and it’s rather scary.

        And of course, Olivia! It’s nice meeting you and I’m looking forward to reading more posts on your blog! The WordPress community has been quite welcoming so far ^.^

        Liked by 1 person

        • I may have just not liked it because I had to read it for school…maybe I’ll try it again another time! 🙂 Thank you for telling me about Brave New World, I’ll have to check it out.

          Aww, it was so nice to meet you, too! Are you a new blogger? If so, welcome to the blogosphere.💓

          Liked by 1 person

          • I also had to read 1984 for school twofold; first for an English class, and another for a book competition. And again, just warning you about Brave New World for its graphicness– it’s definitely eye-popping.

            I’m sort of a new blogger! I’ve been blogging over on Blogger for about five years, but I decided to switch over to WordPress because I wanted to make a change, and I’m really enjoying it so far!

            Liked by 1 person

  9. Ohhhhh, I’m glad to hear this! I’m writing a dystopian sci-fi story so it’s so good to know others still love the genre. xD

    I feel like the predictable plot really allows people to go wild with worldbuilding and play around with making it as unique as possible.

    Liked by 1 person

I'd love to hear from you- let's chat!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s